Archive for the ‘Maritime History’ Category

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United By Water: Exploring American History through the Shipwrecks and Maritime Landscapes of the Great Lakes

February 16, 2011

Funded NEH Opportunity at Thunder Bay for July 2011.

APPLICATION DEADLINE MARCH 1!

Many people in the marine archaeology/maritime heritage community teach—often this is a part-time element in our frequently complicated and unconventional careers.  For those who have teaching and academic service connections to community colleges, the National Endowment for the Humanities has funded a unique opportunity to integrate underwater archaeology, maritime heritage, and associated fields into the college classroom.

Developed in partnership with the Alpena Community College, the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and the Sea Education Association, United By Water: Exploring American History through the Shipwrecks and Maritime Landscapes of the Great Lakes consists of a focused week-long workshop that covers a wide range of hands on and scholarly activities all geared toward integrating maritime historical perspectives into community college courses.  Two sessions are offered during the last two weeks of July 2011.   Successful applicants will receive a $1200 stipend to help defray expenses.  Local housing is available at quite reasonable rates.

For those interested in the intersections between education, heritage, and archaeology, this workshop offers an opportunity to engage with shipwrecks and cutting-edge interpretive resources and programs at the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

The attached flyer describes the program and application process in more detail.   The March 1 deadline is approaching quickly! (download the PDF )

For additional information please visit our the project website at www.alpenacc.edu/shipwrecks or contact either of the Co-directors:  Cathy Green, email cathy.green@noaa.gov or Dr. John Jensen, email jjensen@sea.edu

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Google Art Project and the MUA Maritime Art Gallery

February 8, 2011

Google recently announced a new online initiative called “Art Project” in
which they partnered with 17 art museums around the world and placed high
resolution images online for the public to explore. Each piece includes
viewing notes (click the <<i symbol), information about the artist, and
links to more images by the artist across museums. In addition the
website allows viewers to create their own collection of images selected
from any of the museums.

The MUA has taken advantage of that feature and created a collection
within the Google Art Project of the 41 maritime related images we found
across all 17 museums. We will update the MUA gallery whenever new
museums are added to the project . We invite you to explore this virtual
maritime art museum by clicking on the link on our home page at:

http://www.themua.org

Enjoy!

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The Historic Environment: Shared Heritage and Joint Responsibilities? – By Ian Oxley

November 16, 2010

Throughout a thirty-year career in maritime archaeology, a particular hobby-horse of mine has been an element of good practice management that involves jointly sharing heritage responsibilities, as well as benefits and outcomes.

At a basic level, I think that much maritime and underwater heritage is inherently multi-national, a fundamental property opens up great opportunities for co-operative investigation and use, overriding present day boundaries.  It is derived from mobile carriers (ships and boats) travelling between many locations, involving and impacting on many lives, gathering stories so that a rich heritage resource can be re-told now and in the future.

The contributory elements that make up sites that result from this activity can be investigated and presented for education, research and amenity. Making all this happen effectively would seem to be best delivered by a managed contribution from all interested parties, requiring sharing various elements at a range of levels – experience, expertise, knowledge, data, and international, national, and local. It also needs to be effective because archaeological resources are unique, no two sites are the same, and any investigation should be carefully planned so that the maximum of beneficial return is gained with the minimum of impact. This is the joint responsibility bit because the archaeological heritage is a legacy from the past for the future. I hope to show a few examples of what I mean here.

Read the rest of this entry ?

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Maritime Archaeology in Belgium

October 27, 2009
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Artist Reconstruction of Medieval Fishing Village.

PhD researcher Sorna Khakzad returns to the MUA with her second post featuring underwater archaeology in Europe.  Today’s entry on Belgium highlights past work including submerged medieval fishing villages, shipwrecks, exhibitions, and an online maritime database.

You can view her post by clicking on the “Maritime Archaeology in Belgium” link on our main page here: http://www.themua.org

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And Now for Something Completely Different

August 31, 2009

Ok, so there is no underwater archaeology in this. At least there is something in this about piracy, the Royal Navy, and scuba diving so that’s qualifies as maritime history right? The Expedition to Lake Pahoe.

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A Chinese Junk at Risk

December 1, 2008
The Chinese Junk Free China

The Chinese Junk Free China (Photo courtesy of The Oakland Tribune).

In 1955 five Chinese fishermen and one American diplomat beat the odds and made a transpacific voyage in a Chinese junk from Taiwan to San Francisco. Dione Chen, daughter of one of the crew members, is now on a mission to save this historic vessel.  As one of the last surviving Chinese Junks, Free China is an important piece of maritime material culture but unfortunately it is now in imminent danger of being destroyed.  The group Chinese Junk Preservation has posted an article describing its history and the present situation.  Chen’s post includes historic photos including an interactive zoom view image of the vessel at sea.

We’re reaching out to you our colleagues to share this story and to ask for your advice on how we can save this important vessel.  You can view the post here:

http://www.uri.edu/artsci/his/mua/in_the_field/junk.html

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How Do You Make an Underwater Archaeologist?

February 8, 2008

Underwater archaeologist Mark Staniforth and the Museum of Underwater Archaeology are pleased to announce the 2008 Flinders University Field School Project Journal. Follow along as a new international group of students start their underwater training in Australia. Project journals such as this offer the public the opportunity to see how future underwater archaeologists learn the skills necessary to explore, record, preserve, and learn from submerged cultural resources.

You can view the journal here:

http://www.uri.edu/artsci/his/mua/project_journals/flinders08/flinders08_intro.shtml

We hope you enjoy this latest addition to the Museum of Underwater Archaeology.

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