Posts Tagged ‘technology’

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Underwater Corrosion Testing of the Holland 5 – H.M. Submarine No. 5 By David Crosthwaite-Eyre

December 27, 2012
Diver using a Cygnus Instruments ultrasonic thickness gauge.

Diver using a Cygnus Instruments ultrasonic thickness gauge.

In 1900 the Royal Navy signed a contract to build five ‘Holland’ class submarines. Entering service in 1903, these experimental boats were the Royal Navy’s first submarines, and over the next decade proved the value of the submarine as a weapon of war.

Developments in technology rendered the ‘Hollands’ obsolete and they were either sold for scrap or destined to be used for gunnery practice. HM Submarine No. 5 (the ‘Holland 5’) was en route to a naval yard when it slipped its tow and sunk in 1912. It lay undiscovered off the English south coast until accidentally found in 1995. Now protected by law, it has remained undisturbed on the seabed for almost a century.

In 2010 a Masters student from the School of Applied Sciences at Cranfield University and keen recreational diver, Duncan Harwood, decided to make the Holland 5 the subject of his dissertation.  More specifically, he wished to examine the rate of corrosion suffered by the wreck, and to consider the mechanisms and factors which may have affected that rate of corrosion.

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“How Web Video Powers Global Innovation”

September 17, 2010

I’ve been thinking (again) about the digital aspect of the MUA.  Our goal as an organization has always been to encourage underwater archaeologists to share their research with the public via the web.  That last bit is very important: via the web.  Why?  Because we believe it is the best tool to reach the widest possible audience.  That’s important too because we need to spread the word about ethical underwater archaeology so that the public understands what we do and why it is important to them. It’s not an option for us, it’s a moral imperative.

Originally I had hoped to have a bit more on our site about some of the technical innovations and practices going on in humanities computing but I think we’ve been lacking in that category.  Hopefully we can make up for lost time by highlighting relevant websites, articles, videos etc. that relate to this topic.

Getting back to my opening comments about using the web to reach wider audiences, I recently viewed a “TED Talk” video by Chris Anderson on how web video powers global innovation.  Many of you may already be aware of TED talks, a growing collection of videos hosted by a small nonprofit devoted to “Ideas Worth Spreading.” I could spend hours on that site (could?  I have!).  Have a look at Chris’s talk and see what you think.  Feel free comment here and share your “ideas worth spreading.”

You can view Chris Anderson’s TED  Talk here:

http://www.ted.com/talks/chris_anderson_how_web_video_powers_global_innovation.html

Enjoy

-Kurt