Posts Tagged ‘Maritime History’

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University of Rhode Island 2015 Summer Field School in Maritime Archaeology

March 16, 2015
Student at work in Bermuda.

Student at work in the University of Rhode Island Bermuda field school.

The 2015 Field School in Maritime Archaeology is an ongoing research expedition conducted in Bermuda by faculty of the University of Rhode Island. Participants come from the University of Rhode Island and from other colleges and universities throughout the United States and Canada. The field school is a research-based learning experience that exposes students to a variety of activities including archival research, artifact conservation, archaeological survey, and underwater excavation and documentation of historic shipwrecks.

The field school will be conducted in the three-week period from July 20 to August 8, 2015. Students will receive 3-6 undergraduate or graduate credits in history. The field school meets many of the fieldwork requirements for anthropology and archaeology majors at universities in the United States and beyond. Professors Rod Mather and James M. Allan of the University of Rhode Island History Department are the program directors. Dr. Allan and Dr. Mather have extensive experience in underwater archaeological field methods, remote sensing, archival research, and scientific diving.

Course enrollment is limited. There are no academic prerequisites, but all participants in the field school must be scuba divers certified to at least the Open Water level, and all must be at least Scientific Divers-in- Training as specified in the American Academy of Underwater Sciences’ (AAUS) Diving Safety Manual. Contact Dr. Mather or Dr. Allan to discuss how the latter training may be obtained prior to the start of the field school. Students must have their own diving equipment (tanks and weights will be provided).

Students learning survey techniques in Bermuda.

Students learning survey techniques in Bermuda.

While in Bermuda, students will participate in each of three research modules: laboratory training in the museum’s conservation facility, archaeological survey and documentation of historic shipwrecks, and archival research in the Bermuda National Archives, located in the nearby city of Hamilton. Students selecting the 3- credit option will be required to keep a field journal containing details of each day’s research activities, instruction, and procedures. Journals will be submitted for evaluation at the end of the field school. Students will also be required to prepare and submit a scaled plan of the shipwreck site that we will be documenting, and will participate in preparing a collaborative report on the field school that will be submitted for publication in MariTimes, the magazine of the National Museum of Bermuda. Students selecting a 6-credit option will be required to complete all activities for the 3-credit option plus a research paper using materials presented in the course reader, supplementary readings available in the National Museum of Bermuda’s library, or from primary documents available in the Bermuda National Archives. In addition, while in Bermuda students will attend periodic evening lectures on such topics as ship construction, archaeological theory and methodology, archival research methods, archaeological survey methods (magnetometer and visual survey), site excavation and mapping, analysis of archaeological data, and the conservation of waterlogged artifacts.

The course fee is $3,500, all-inclusive, except airfare. Full course credit. For additional information contact Dr. Mather (RodMather@uri.edu) (401-874-4093) or Dr. Allan (jallan@stmarys-ca.edu) (925-253-9070). Application form and additional information are available on the field school website at http://www.uri.edu/international/bermuda.

For information on the research diving requirements contact URI’s Diving Safety Officer Anya Hanson <anyahanson@uri.edu.

Student working with instructor Dr. James Allan in Bermuda.

Student working with instructor Dr. James Allan in Bermuda.

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Sessions 5 -8 from the 2014 Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage Now Online

July 22, 2014

Today the Museum of Underwater Archaeology releases an additional twenty eight papers and four videos from the proceedings of the 2014 Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage. Introductory videos by session organizers describe the reasons for convening their panels and their hopes for future research paths.

The sessions featured this week include:

Session 5: Early Modern Colonialism in the Asia-Pacific Region (Organizer:
Dr. María Cruz Berrocal)

Session 6: Iberian Global Interactions: the Manila Galleon and the Roteiro
(Organizers: Veronica Walker, Brian Fahy, and Bobby C. Orillaneda;
interview with Veronica Walker)

Session 7: Preservation and Conservation of Wet Archaeological Materials
and Site Management (Organizers: Vicki Richards and Jon Carpenter)

Session 8: Ceramics from Shipwrecks, Harbours, Ports and Related
Archaeological Sites (Organizer: Atthasit Sukkham)

You can view the collections here:

http://www.themua.org/collections/collections/show/13

 

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2014 Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage Now Online

July 15, 2014

The Museum of Underwater Archaeology is proud to announce the launch of the online proceedings for the 2014 Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage. This impressive collection will include over 100 papers, video interviews, and posters all freely available online. Today we are releasing the conference introduction and papers from the first four of fifteen sessions. Each week we will publish additional materials. Introductory interviews with the session chairs discuss the impetus for organizing the session and identifies future directions for research in that topic.

Today’s release includes:
-General conference introduction, including video interviews with conference chair Dr. Hans Van Tilburg and keynote speakers Dr. James Delgado and Dr. Sayan Praicharnjit

– Session 1: UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage and International Cooperation (Chair: Etienne Clement)

– Session 2: New Approaches in UCH Management in the US (Chair: Dr. Hans Van Tilburg)

– Session 3: Underwater Cultural Heritage, Museums, and Sustainable Development (Chair: Dr. Bill Jeffery)

– Session 4: Underwater Cultural Heritage in Oceania (Chair: Dr. Akatsuki Takahashi)

You can view the collections here:

http://www.themua.org/collections/collections/show/13

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SHA Tech Week: Underwater and Public Archaeology

September 18, 2012

It’s Tech Week for the SHA blog about underwater and public archaeology.  We’re very pleased to be a part of this with the lead off article. You can read all posts here:  http://www.sha.org/blog/index.php/category/technology/

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Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage in Peru – By Carlos E. Ausejo

August 16, 2011

The Peruvian Centre for Maritime and Underwater Archaeology (CPAMS) was started at the end of 2010 and is currently made up of four founding members and an associate researcher. We intend to form a multidisciplinary team although at present we are still only archaeologists. The aim of the CPAMS is to promote scientific archaeological research in underwater maritime environments, rivers and lakes, their interaction areas on land as well as the impact that the maritime landscape has on society’s development over time. We seek to disseminate information on, protect, preserve, and conserve our natural and archaeological heritage that is distributed over the 2250km of the Pacific coastline, rivers, coastal and highland lakes and make it valued, by way of organizing educational programs for archaeologists as well as workshops on social development and awareness.

The importance of maritime and underwater archaeology in Peru lies in the extraordinary state of preservation of the materials which allows access to information not previously recorded (in the case of pre-Hispanic findings) as well as by contrasting findings with written sources. (Colonial and Republican era) Read the rest of this entry ?

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Asia-Pacific Underwater Cultural Heritage – By Dr. Mark Staniforth

April 12, 2011

I was fortunate enough to attend a UNESCO regional meeting on Underwater Cultural Heritage held in the magnificent Istanbul Archaeology Museum in October 2010. Of the eighteen nations from the Eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea region that were formally represented, no less than fourteen (or nearly 80%) have ratified the UNESCO Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage (2001). Another part of the world where there has been a very significant level of ratification has been Latin America and the Caribbean and one really important consequence of this has been the decline in official, state-supported, treasure hunting activities in these areas. On the other hand there are large areas of the world where very few countries have ratified the Convention – Northern Europe, sub-Saharan Africa and, sadly, my own region in Asia and the Pacific. Of the forty-eight nations included in the UNESCO region of Asia and the Pacific, for example, only two countries have ratified the Convention – Cambodia and Iran (or less than 5% of the countries in the region). There are, of course, many complex geo-political reasons why individual nations, or indeed whole regions, have failed to ratify this Convention in the nearly ten years since it was passed by UNESCO in late 2001. Some countries (like Australia) make much of the difficulties associated with federal nations trying to bring state and federal legislation into line with the provisions of the Convention and other countries claim to have issues with sovereignty and flagged vessels. I remain unconvinced by this kind of rhetoric and suspect that many countries are simply unwilling to expend funds in what is seen to be a relatively ‘unimportant’ area. Read the rest of this entry ?

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Building a Birchbark Canoe

March 29, 2011

Anyone interested in the North American fur trade during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries is certainly familiar with the important role played by the birchbark canoe. Its light weight and cargo capacity allowed fur traders to take advantage of a network of lakes, rivers, and streams that nearly crossed the continent.  Yet these vessels, so important to the colonial economies of New France and British America, were constructed from natural materials like spruce roots, cedar, pine resins, and of course tree bark so it is little wonder that they rarely survive in the archaeological record.

Fortunately the building tradition was not lost over time.  Books such as The Bark Canoes and Skin Boats of North America by Edwin Tappan Adney and Howard Chappelle, documented the materials and building techniques used for several canoe varieties.  The following video shows Mr. Francois Rothan building a birchbark canoe in Quebec in 2007.  While a few modern tools are used the basic steps shown are very similar to those used centuries ago.

The MUA would like to thank Mr. Rothan for sharing this video with us.

You can learn more about Mr. Rothan and see other examples of his work at http://birchbarkcanoes.blogspot.com/